a new perspective on faith for a crazy world

Posts tagged ‘inspiration’

New Who brouhaha belongs in the loo

Jodie Whittaker

Jodie Whittaker, the newest regeneration of Doctor Who

Forgive us, Brits, for descending into impolite language. But the current controversy over the latest regeneration of the long-running Doctor Who character is too crass to believe. Most fans seem to have taken the news in stride, but a vocal few have joined the ranks of ugly internet trolls, voicing their protest in not very nice terms.

(For those who don’t follow this historic BBC sci-fi series, a few words of background: this series has been on the air since the 1960s, right around the time that John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Part of its charm is that every so often, the lead character, the “Doctor,” changes appearance, and becomes a new person, thanks to the new actor in the role. The latest reincarnation is a woman — actress Jodie Whittaker — the first time the Doctor has ever undergone a gender change!)

In light of what’s been going on in the world these days, particularly the mess that is being caused by a number of traditionally male politicians, having a female Doctor should be the least of our concerns. Actually, in truth, it’s a welcome relief. Perhaps at last she can bring some long-needed compassion, feeling, and sensibility to the role.

For the same reason that droves of women are marching on Washington, running for political office, and making their voices known, this revolution in the BBC’s kingdom is something to be celebrated, rather than criticised or cursed. If Doctor Who can be thought of as a “religion,” (which it is, for many fans), it’s the equivalent of throwing out the carved-in-stone words of the Bible and starting all over again.

On a deeper level — which is what this Noofaith blog is all about — it marks a radical sea-change in the ways of the world. Traditional Western Christian spirituality, for far too long, has been unfairly dominated and monopolised by men. Without going into great detail, one of the earliest church theologians, St. Augustine, did the faith irreparable harm a long, long time ago with his rather prejudiced, sexist interpretations of the original tenets of Christ’s teachings. Unfortunately, all the others who followed in his footsteps not only compounded his original sin, but made it even worse in the centuries afterwards, cementing his perspective in practically every aspect of religious practice, not the least of which was the “males only” requirement for the priesthood.

There was even a time in the Middle Ages when an infamous tract called Hammer Against The Witches became an unofficial misogynistic rulebook for male church leaders, equating women with witches and reinforcing their subjugation and domination by poorly-educated, ill-informed clergymen who feared their power being usurped by wiser, more loving, more visionary female representatives of the faith.

So, welcome, Jodie Whittaker! It’s about time that this happened. It’s been a long time in coming, and we’re excited that the BBC has finally seen the light. May you have a long, fruitful, inspiring, and entertaining tenure in the role!

Sometimes new insights can be ancient!

A friend just shared a link to a Vimeo production on “being a mensch”, which is an old tradition that is actually so extremely applicable to what we’re going through today.

The Making of a Mensch from The Moxie Institute on Vimeo.

It’s a New Cloud Film from the Let It Ripple Film Series — a message which is insightful, inspirational, helpful, playful, thought-provoking, and entertaining, and needs to be shared with more people (no matter what faith you profess, wherever you are, and whoever you are becoming in this journey of life).

This new 11 minute film and accompanying discussion kit takes the science that was explored in a previous film, “The Science of Character,” and reframes it through the lens of the ancient Jewish teachings of “Mussar.” The film and discussion materials are an opportunity to revitalize these teachings around character development that date back to the 10th century, and reengage us all in how these Jewish tools are applicable to our 21st century lives.

And, yes, you don’t have to be Jewish to appreciate this. Honestly, if more of us who weren’t could take steps towards becoming part of this growing movement of “mensch” development, regardless of our denomination (or belief system), the world would be in much better shape to fight the evils facing us today.